Eye tracking

Handbook of Process Tracing Methods

WOOP WOOP - here it is - the second edition of our beloved “Handbook of Process Tracing Methods” If you can’t wait - buy it here: https://www.crcpress.com/A-Handbook-of-Process-Tracing-Methods-2nd-Edition/Schulte-Mecklenbeck-Kuehberger-Johnson/p/book/9781138064218 It is bigger and better than the first edition, comes with the classics (Figner on skin conductance, Willemsen on Mouselab and many more) and many new awesome chapters - here is a list: 1 Eye Fixations as a Process Trace - J. Edward Russo

Eye-Tracking with N > 1

This is one of the fastest papers I have ever written. It was a great collaboration with Tomás Lejarraga from the Universitat de les Illes Balears. Why was it great? Because it is one of the rare cases (at least in my academic life) where all people involved in a project contribute equally and quickly. Often, the weight of a contribution lies with one person which slows down things – with Tomás this was different – we were often sitting in front of a computer writing together (have never done this before, thought it would not work).

New Paper on pychodiagnosis and eye-tracking

Cilia Witteman and Nanon Spaanjaars (my dutch connection) worked together on a piece on whether psychodiagnosticians improve over time (they don’t) in their ability to classify symptoms to DSM categories. This turned out to be a pretty cool paper combining eye-tracking data with a practical, and hopefully, relevant question. Schulte-Mecklenbeck, M., Spaanjaars, N.L., & Witteman, C.L.M. (in press). The (in)visibility of psychodiagnosticians’ expertise. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdm.1925 Abstract This study investigates decision making in mental health care.